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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
makes me mad. >> this is what goes on in higher education. it is increasing revenue for the insiders and not worry the students . not talk about $100 application how about 400 billion we spend on higher education and producing graduates who don't have the skills that our economies. >> morg oon. going back to thedea of a scam. it is it better than seeing it loosened in the classroom. >> and in thepped of the day. paying 60,000 for the students is watered down. and don't blame the application fee and blame the government subsidies. >> hold on, there st. a scam. >> it is fair to call it a scam and colleges are trying fobring in more applicants. it is news and world report that they are trying to move up on. >> and thin - then they are saying parents and young people are dumkophs. >> and hold on. john wants in. >> can we stop crying for the happenplicant. they know the game. >> they don't unless i are watching the show. >> and every college applicant looks at u.s. news world reports and do it on rankings. they are playog their need and to suspect they are taken advantage of is laughable.
of education and the state education commissioner failed to take steps to protect the children from, quote, foreseeable harm. he says his client whom he is not identifying suffered serious emotional and psychological trauma as a result of the shooting. >>> the fbi is reporting an increase in a request for background checks for new gun purchases in the wake of the connecticut school shooting. this as new bills have been introduced calling forearmed teachers. claudia is live in los angeles. claudia, we know some states allow teachers to bring licensed concealed weapons into public schools. >> yes, just a few do, harris, allowing it without exception, hawaii, new hampshire, oregon and utah. we are in salt lake city and hundreds attended a training seminar. in a violent situation the educators were taught to first initiate a lock down, but if that failed, the teachers want to know how to respond properly. >> you know, i think that a lot of people have a fear of guns and what they can do. but i think also maybe they are not quite educated, but sometimes the only thing that will stop a bad guy w
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
. and to give them land and to give them livestock into pay for the transportation and education, transportation especially to someplace where they could live undisturbed as free people. and it's interesting, when this bit of information came out in the smithsonian magazine an excerpt from the book, a number of people said to me that they had never heard of it. and i said i never heard of it either until i stumbled across this in philadelphia. and a couple people have thought about this. the parlor game when you hope your book is being made into a movie, who do want to start in it, people began to say i wonder whom he could free? people thought of john and priscilla hemings. they said well, maybe he could have freed some of his farmers, and then someone said, the faucets. he could've freed joe. you was a blacksmith. and ed was his cook and had a whole bunch of children. and it turned out any auction of jefferson's estate after the war, and after his death, joseph was in 13. jefferson left the rest of the family in slavery, and they're scattered to different masters. and joseph worked for 10 year
specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different angle. that is why not study the person that knew them the best? for example what possibly could i as an historian could should be to the body of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or th
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
votes and cut those deals in part because of his lifelong political education. he began it as a young man in well yams burg, he listened to patrick henry said -- he spoke of henry, he spoke as homer wrote and loved that, partly because he couldn't do it. it's always a good sign when they recognize qualities in orrs which they don't pez. that kind of humility, however relative that term is in talking about this species called politicians is a virtue. he learned how to master the ways and means of politics because of that disastrous governorship. i think he was much faster to react to louisiana when the purchase became open and a possibility. as you'll remember, basically, napoleon is going to sell this to us, one of the great real estate deals ever. and jefferson immediately in 1803 begins to think, well, we're going to have to amend the constitution to do it because he was a strict constructionist, right? he had followed alexander hamilton over broad presidential powers. then about the third week of august, 1803 -- that was the fourth of july. about the third or week of august he gets
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
advocates and his godfather was the cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a camp
as her husband, lizzie was much better educated having attended both elementary and boarding schools and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing this exceedingly capable woman couldn't do from layingly knoll yum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away in england, and later she helped to run the mill's boarding house. she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there was no economic reason for her to be absorbing these responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and development. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, but lizzie had raised his children as her own and given birth to eight more as well. of these ten children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of accomplishment, all were thriving. nelly and nina, 23 and 20, had grown into smart, educated youn
. that is why my children are staying right here. >> it is a rumor that is depriving children of an education despite the fact that doctors in the camp have not found a single case of tb. the family has a new neighbor. three days ago, he fled with his wife and children to jordan. for now, they have to live in a tent until there is a container for them. the temperature is sometimes below freezing. it is very tough. >> we have children and it is terribly cold at night. i have asked for more blankets, but they told me i had to wait. >> her eldest son wants to leave the camp. he received death threats after an argument. stranded without any prospects for the future, frustration can easily turn into violence, but the security forces will not let him out. the jordanian government wants to prevent syrian refugees from going underground. meanwhile, aisha is terrified the violence of the syrian civil war could spread to the camp. >> i want to leave. my children and i want to go home. >> but she knows, and so do her children, that there is no going back. >> in the united states, house speaker john boeh
to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my royal pail, and i have my royal shovel, and i'm
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacation that he was optimistic. logistically the white house will tell you it's possible. when you listen t
educators feel about giving teachers firearms training? bob hinky is a principal at mountain crest high school. how do you feel about this? >> well, i think the teachers have that right and so i feel like it's okay, but i have some things i'm very concerned about. i personally wouldn't carry a gun or get a concealed weapon myself. the concerns i have is the concealed weapons, i have a friend who just received his a couple of years ago and through the training, they never used a gun and had a gun in the class. i worry about the training that they have to actually fire the firearm and to use it. without endangering others as well. so there things i'm concerned about, having a concealed weapon on campus of course is -- we have strict policies that relate to that to ensure everyone is safe and a teacher if they violated that policy because they don't want to put others at risk either. >> what about having the weapon in school and having a kid possibly have access to it. that opens the door for accidents. >> absolutely. that's one of the concerns. so our policy is that it has to be concealed
education in the 1920s was in general thought to be pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. was to become a better life, a better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post secondary education, primarily. women did go into the teaching profession, and so carson certainly could've been a teacher. she could've taught biology, or writing eventually for that matter. that would've been a career avenue that would've been open to a. science was also more open to women than other disciplines were. the marine biological laboratory at, was a place where a lot of prominent women scientists study. one of carson's predecessors was another person who went on to actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers studying marine biology, which i find kind of interesting. but yes, carson's prospects would've a very circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking order today with someone about her role and whether there was something that was gender oriented about the fact that she was really
, broke through the door and captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably the lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edmonds said to him take me to the commander of the fort and that is exactly what he did. with his tongue begun in his side the fabulous four went through the battery, down an elevator, went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of the guns of navarrone type situation. and the commanding officer's office and he decided to break through the door and the commanding officer gave him -- what you want? we would like you to surrender the 4 ridge. the commanding officer's -- he was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the telephone and said you are my prisoner. at that point, robert edmond had one of the greatest bluffs of world war ii, pull out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender. at that point, eight hundred men surrendered after rebroadcast that over the loudspeaker. incredible story of world war ii that is completely
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
in a community afflicted by and foreclosures. those children show their scars in their educational development of personal development and emotional development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explain why we have not got the resources to do something about unemployment, another one of these economic downturns of capitalism to lyle was scratched my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate that the cost of not doing something is larger. ought to have been undertaken long ago. just as in this case, the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person would be to ask yourself, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalisms and stability took this terrible turn in the 1930's something very different happened then is happening now. major steps were taken by a democratic president's, middle of the rover, mr. obama, everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the road. he became something else and a lot of things for the people. none of those are being done now that is a remarkable difference in the way you han
educating them. with that said, i'm concerned about investors in general not really understanding what they have, and if interest rates go up, even a small amount, there could be negative rates of returns on securities or funds and how will they react, particularly in an environment where there's a potential for less liquidity. dagen: washington, as they have in the past, pardon the language, screws things up, though, then the fed a likely to stay accommodative; right? in the coming year, do you think? >> they absolutely are. i think it's probably, at least near term, the right policy. my concern is if inflation unexpectedly rises for some reason, will they be quick enough to pull away all the enormous liquidity in the market place? they feel they can, but we have seen instances before in the past 20-30 # years where that's not been the case, and it's going to be pretty hard to figure out so, to me, that's one of the bigger, longer term issues not to come into play, at least through much of 2013. dagen: bob, really quickly, what do you like owning right now? what helps you sleep? what
know her. the michelle obama who loves being first lady. she is a very very intelligent, well-educated, well spoken woman with a great opinion and a strong opinion but who also has a reputation kerned for liking the very comfortable lifestyle and here in the white house she has people taking care of her every want and wish. she as you know has gone on many many vacations, some of them quite controversial to spain and the ski slopes in the western united states. she's been at one point during the period of several months, 42 days on vacation. she is living the life of a very pampered woman and apparently this fits with her personality. >> you right, where's the clintons were open and above horrid about their co-presidency posting that hillary was an equal partner with bill, the obamas have been careful to hide the fact that michelle is the president's most important political adviser and the one he listens to above all others before he makes decisions. >> yes and i think that's so true. the way she does that is often through her very best friend, how she gets her opinions through. her
. host: at any time take after his father whether he would study classical education, becomes? guest: when he was five or six he was writing his only little history of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video g e game, age of kings. it is very -- you build your own castles and that was -- i let little play it as much as he wanted to. he took to reading and he loves histo faulkner. he is a reader. so, i just stand back because he will go wherever he goes. host: go back there. what about the 1980's. what work did you do then? guest: at a certain point after factories and bar tending my father had been an employee, the japanese with call him a company man in a small manufacturing company outside of boston and he had moved from sales manager to vice president to president without any equity. my brother and i both worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steams valves and heavy iron castings for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was lit manufacturing but -- light manufacturing but dirty, dusty. that is what our summer jobs consisted of. my
is at st. john's in annapolis, loving it. >> he does not take after his father -- a classical education, books? >> when he was five or six he was writing his own histories of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video game, age of kings. you build your own castles and -- i let him play as much as he wanted to. he took to reading. he loves history, faulkner, he is a reader. so i just stand back. he will go wherever he goes. >> what about the 1980's -- what kind of work did you do then? >> at a certain point, after factories and bartending, my father had been an employee at a japanese company and outside of boston. he had moved up to vice president to president with no equity and a share stock. my brother and i had worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steam valves and big heavy iron casting for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was light manufacturing, but dirty, dusty, and that is what a summer job consisted of. my brother is older -- he came out of the army and went in as jr. purchasing clerk. sometime in the late 1970's i had had an of
scandinavian and educated at a liberal arts college in the university -- he said to me, the low-scaled american worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. [laughter] he said it's sad, but it's true. the american-based ceo of the one of the world's largest fund managers told me about a conversation that handed in his investment committee. quite often people would tell me things like they didn't say it, but their friends said snit my kids do that also sometimes. so he said this is someone else on the investigating committee said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that
the car in front of costco and san francisco near tents and harrison yesterday afternoon. >> education officials at santa cruz city schools are expected to consider a resolution next month calling for stricter national gun-control laws. >> the school board's vice president is drafting a symbolic statement calling for a ban on assault weapons and high up pass the ammunition to nationwide. >> the vice-president is also taking for greater state and federal investment in middle health care. >> the school were will urge the area's nine other school district pass similar resolutions. >> coming up on the kron 4 morning news former president h. w. bush is in intensive care this morning. an update on his condition next. >> also a live look outside on this thursday morning we do not have any fog in the south bay but it is a chilly start to the morning. more details on a forecast later. the time is 4:23. welcome back. the time is 4:25. >> former president george h. w. bush is in intensive care at a houston hospital this morning. >> mr. bush's been hospitalized there since last month with what is
after she was assassinated. he spoke at a rally with his father. the president said his son's education is finished and his training has begun. two-time prime minister benazir bhutto was killed at a campaign rally in 2007. >>> and it's not all doom and gloom for the u.s. economy. home sales moved at the fastest pace in more than two years. sales rose more than 4.5%. sale were in-flighted by a temporary tax credit for home buyers. and investing more than $773 million in the manufacturing plants in michigan, the. says it will update and he can pand production lines at six plants in the state and creating more than 2,000 hourly jobs. it's all part of a deal that ford made to invest more than $6 billion in u.s. plants by the year 2015. >>> and a mother who hoped to spend christmas with her husband and two children turned to the online community for help. she was facing mountain bills and a major surgery. our affiliate wftx has her story. >> in this four-minute youtube video, jennifer johnson doesn't say a word but yet says so much as she tells the story of her heart condition that would kil
. arizona's attorney general proposing to change the state law that would allow an educator in each school to carry a gun. the "l.a. times," the city of los angeles collected more than -- this story is unbelievable. they collected more than 2,000 firearms part of a guns for groceries buyback program. 75 assault weapons were included in that and two rocket launchers were turned in for cash. >> they got steak and shrimp for the rocket launchers. what about teachers with guns in classrooms? >> i mean, it's amazing to me. i had randy wine gart ten of the american federation of teachers on my show last night. it's outrageous to me on two levels. one, you're going to put more guns into schools it to try to deal with getting guns out of the school. you don't have money for students. you don't have money for sports and arts. you don't have money for anything you need in school, but you're going to find money to buy guns, bullets and training for teachers? where did the conservatives come up with this money from? how, if you had an armed teacher, would that have solved newtown? it would have made t
to call you before, sir. the recent article about how president obama had been educated about china and decided that he had to take a tougher stance vis-a-vis china. the article drew heavily on the national security council person responsible for china during president obama's first two or three years. was that posturing for the political campaign, or is it correct that president obama wants to have a a a more hard- nosed posture vis-a-vis china? what are doing about it? >> president obama believes that when we enter into agreements with other countries and there is negotiation and we lower barriers, and open our markets to companies from other countries, when we enter into those agreements, those countries have to reciprocate. the have to live up to their agreements, otherwise the american people, the american congress will ask, why should we enter into another trade agreement with another country if those other countries get the benefit of the bargain and we do not enforce our rights? that is why you are seeing under president obama more actions against china, taken to the wto, wh
with skills, a good level of education. we can take advantage of that, even compared with our peers so let's do everything we can to -- the benefit of these positive advantages and not be -- not present people to invest in france because they might be afraid of a lack of visibility on the taxpayers or too high taxes. >> but do you think it's sending the right signal to investors when it's threatening to nationalize a factory? >> no, certainly not. these are not the right ones and clearly what an investor needs is, again, confident. immediately going forward, illustrate will not suffer from taxes or a potential threat. the message should be positive for investors, not just french one, but also we have a strategy to reduce stability. >> but do you understand some people could be forced to leave the country because of increasing back pressure? >> there is a lot of debate around that. my view is that is not the right thing to think that you can put people, like, in jail. it is important to be competitive by providing a favorable environment, something where people will want to stay, invest, cr
a serious recession in these markets, these sectors. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smoker -- smaller class is. -- now one high a capacity schools because they produce morons. you mentioned something that i agree with. -- disagree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of punishment -- fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1976. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. output enormous strains -- that put enormous strength and families. my friends in sociology say that this is correlated with
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)